Michigan Foundations Short-Change Underserved Communities

(Clean water protesters. Residents of Flint Michigan were let down when public water was horribly contaminated due to institutional neglect).

From 2003 to 2013, Michigan’s 66 foundations – including some of the largest in the nation, such as The W.K. Kellogg Foundation, McGregor Fund, and The Kresge Foundation – gave $10.3 billion to programs based in the United States. During that period, the U.S. was at war and was in the midst of the worst economic recession since the great depression. In a word, It was a period of great uncertainty for many.

Yet only 31% of that $10.3 went toward programs that benefited lower-income people and other disadvantaged communities and vulnerable populations, including people of color, children, domestic workers, immigrants and refugees, the incarcerated and formerly incarcerated, the LGBTQ community, people with disabilities, people with HIV/AIDS, sex workers, and women and girls who have been victims of abuse.

Support for advocacy, citizen engagement, community organizing, and long-term solutions to inequality faired even worse. Finding solutions to global income inequality can’t even begin when, here at home, we put forth limited resources for finding solutions to inequalities in our own neighborhoods.

So far, the year 2017 has brought rapid change and nonprofits will undoubtedly look to foundations for support and direction over the next decade. The election 2016 fallout has led many funders to change course.

Groups of people previously passed over for by funders have become top priorities, and programs previously considered ineffective because of their grand social visions are receiving renewed attention. Upcoming grant cycles will most likely see an influx of funding for nonprofits dedicated to underserved populations and social justice issues.

Discover more information on funders and nonprofit organizations by reviewing their information available online through the Foundation Center.

Undocumented Immigrants in Holding Hunger Strike

(The Berks County Residential Center located in Leesport, Pennsylvania.)

Women at a Pennsylvania residential center housing undocumented immigrants are on hunger strike to call attention to the slow mechanisms of government authorities in dealing with their cases.

The Berks County Residential Center is home to three families that have been housed at the facility for over a year. The maximum amount of time suggested by law that undocumented immigrants can be housed before transferral is 20 days – a timeframe that the Obama Administration claims is upheld by US Immigrant and Customs Enforcement (ICE). As evidenced by the cases in Pennsylvania, however, this norm is obviously broken with some regularity.

The center houses dozens of women and their children – many from Central America – who claim to have fled violence in their home countries in the hopes of securing a better life.

In a letter signed by 22 women held at the Berks County Residential Center, the psychological toll on their children is thrown into sharp relief:

Our children, who range in age from 2 to 16, have been deprived of a normal life. We are already traumatized from our countries of origin. We risked our own lives and those of our children so we could arrive on safe ground. While here our children have considered committing suicide, made desperate from confinement. The teenagers say that being here, life makes no sense. One of our children said he wanted to break the window to jump out and end this nightmare.

Advocates working on behalf of the undocumented immigrants believe as many as 26 women are participating in the hunger strike, which is now entering its second week. You can read the full letter signed by the strikers here.

US authorities have received criticism in the past for brutal detention centers and questionable practices that infringe on undocumented immigrants’ human rights.

The Tap will have more as the strike in Pennsylvania continues.

The Chicago Community Trust Follows Ford’s Lead

(The Chicago Community Trust President Terry Mazany)

The Ford Foundation appears to have struck a nerve.

Following the grant-making giant’s announcement in June to provide more funding for nonprofit operations support, other groups are following suit. Terry Mazany – president of The Chicago Community Trust – announced that his organization will begin offering grants from between $35,000 to $300,000 to Chicago’s “anchor organizations.” The grants are designed to explicitly fund operations budgets.

Mazany acknowledged the shortcomings of hitherto applied grant-making criteria in a speech at his foundation’s “State of the Community” event:

As foundations, we have been rightfully accused of creating too much administrative work that takes nonprofit resources away from their mission and establishing grant requirements that distort a nonprofit’s mission in order to satisfy funder priorities. Some of the things we do actually undermine your ability to be successful.

It may take years before this new framework proves its worth, but the logic behind it is predicated on basic business concepts. When invested with unrestricted capital, businesses can grow dynamically. Nonprofits, however, have long been bogged down by onerous requirements attached to their funding. The results-based, programmatic approach that demands concrete reporting on the progress of carefully delineated line items does not typically give nonprofits flexibility.

No-strings-attached funding provides nonprofits with breathing room, allowing them to accrue staff, make technology improvements, and increase overhead with the goal of improving overall efficacy as opposed to supporting individual projects.

Mazany also announced that, like the Ford Foundation, the Chicago Community Trust will begin focusing inequality and social justice causes. In strong words, he remarked: “We must stop kicking the can of racism down the road for the next generation to resolve.”

Key Elements Group LLC will continue reporting on this trend in grant-making.

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